Friday, 6 April 2007

T. rex ate coconuts

A new museum in Petersburg, Kentucky greets visitors with a 20ft tall tumbling waterfall and at its base, mannequins of frolicking children play amongst dinosaurs. The Creation Museum, which cost $25 million to build, is home to many unusual sites: a diorama of ancient people overshadowed by a towering T. rex, Adam and Eve swimming in a river with giant reptiles, and even a scale model of Noah's Ark. It seems Noah solved the problem of fitting dinosaurs into his vessel by only taking baby dinosaurs. Indeed, the ark has a detailed display of many animals happily boarding the boat: dinosaurs cavort with giraffes, penguins, hippos, and bears.

Museum guides tell visitors that before Adam and Eve were expelled from paradise all of the dinosaurs were peaceful plant-eaters. In Genesis 1:30 God gives ‘green herb’ to every creature to eat and so there were no predators. When a curious museum visitor asks, why exactly T. rex had six-inch long serrated teeth, the guides go on to explain that T. rex used his big teeth to open coconuts. Apparently it was only after Adam and Eve sinned and were cast out of paradise that the dinosaurs started to eat flesh.

My opinion: I think the people who built this museum are smoking a bit too much ‘green herb’.

10 comments:

Laelaps said...

While it would be somewhat comforting to think Ham and Co. were merely smoking some wacky tobaccy, unfortunately it seems they're suffering from quite real delusions.

Also, I love the old rex picture you put up... I remember the book that picture was in and used to get it out from the library all the time. All you need now is one of a "Brontosaurus" neck deep in a swamp and you'll be all set, hah.

Don Thieme said...

You have some great blogs here. All I can think of on this one is "...put the lime in the coconut and drink it all up!"

Anonymous said...

Funny you should mention T. rex, there are many scientists who now believe he wasn't a predator after all. This has nothing to do with Creation vs. Evolution, it has to do with evidence. It seems the evidence for T. rex NOT being a predator is stronger than the evidence for the contrary.


Read about it here: http://dsc.discovery.com/guides/dinosaur/trex/feature/feature.html

Adam said...

Oh, wow. A non-working link just proves it's not a predator.

Mike said...

The non-working link actually should have been:

http://dsc.discovery.com/news/briefs/20041018/trex.html

And it has nothing to do with not being a predator

Anonymous said...

Did the poster who said that the T. rex wasnt a predator think we wouldnt look at the link or read it?

wrg said...

Maybe the poster who said that the T. rex wasn't a predator didn't actually read it. "Ooh, eats like a mammal! Mammals eat green herbs and coconuts, right?"

Anonymous said...

The link works just fine for me, and discusses evidence that T. Rex was a scavenger, not a hunter.

http://dsc.discovery.com/search/results.html?query=tyrannosaurus+feature&search.x=29&search.y=8

Sordes said...

The picture on the top was painted by the great Zdeněk Burian, one of the best paleo-artists of all time. In book I own, which is only illustrated with paintings of Burian, this one is entitled as Tarbosaurus bataar, and not Tyrannosaurus, which was shown a page before.

joseph said...

Funny thing those Christians. Whenever they want to oppose the scientific consensus they claim 'there are many scientists who now believe...'.but present no names of those 'many scientists'! The article actually states it is one scientists who makes this assertion based on his speculation, but to the contrary:

"Horner says the reaction to his hypothesis is often heated. His colleagues in paleontology seem largely unconvinced" ..."The most common professional objection to Horner's scavenger hypothesis is that most predators will scavenge if they stumble across a free meal, and many scavengers will kill prey when the opportunity presents itself. T. rex, this argument goes, was almost certainly an opportunist — both a scavenger and a predator as the situation dictated.
Horner gives no quarter on this issue."

It is therefore a lie that this article claims "It seems the evidence for T. rex NOT being a predator is stronger than the evidence for the contrary."

Lil Joe